The Perfect Pie Crust Recipe

A homemade pie crust – one that is made from scratch, and by you (not your mother, or your grandmother, your husband, one of your kids, your neighbor or your aunt) can seem like a daunting task.  It’s certainly easier (but far less rewarding) to just buy one from the store.

I have finally found a recipe that I can follow, that’s not crushed graham cracker crumbs or cookies of some sort.  I mean, a real McCoy, 100% legit, Martha-Stewart-I-see- you, type of a pie crust.  Finally, this is it!

My grandmother had shared her pie crust-making secrets with me years ago.  Truth be known- I never bothered to follow her specific instructions until now.

“Meeka,” she’d say, “You’ve got to make sure that your butter is cold, and the other ingredients are room temperature (like your flour, sugar, etc.)” and “You have to be sure and use ice water.”

Ice water.

Okay, that sounds simple enough.  This should be easy to follow.  Right?  Ice water seems easy enough to come by.   Unless, you choose to translate the term, “ice water” into “lukewarm water” or at best, “cold water straight out of the tap.”  It should produce the same results, right?  Not.

Even with the clearest of instructions, I have never once followed her recipe to a “T”.   Consequently, my pie crusts have never turned out just right.  They have never been anything that I could be proud of.  I have always wanted a 100% homemade pie from start to finish.  And now, I have finally, finally found the crust recipe, that I have been looking for!

Homemade Pie Crust Recipe

(This recipe makes one pie crust)

1 1/4 all-purpose flour

1/2 cup of cold butter (cut into cubes)

1/2 teaspoon of sugar

1/4 teaspoon of salt

1/4 of ice water

Directions:

Starting with very cold butter, cut the butter into cubes.

In a separate bowl, combine the dry ingredients and add in all of the cubed butter, and begin to blend with a pastry blender, until crumbly.

Add ice water, one tablespoon at a time.  *Note: This should be ice water, and not room temperature water, nor the coldest water that you can manage to get from the tap.

Add ice water, one tablespoon at a time, and continue to mix with the pastry blender gently.  Add enough water until the mixture begins to form into a dough.

 

Once the dough begins to stick to the pastry blender, scrape all of it off and back into the bowl, with a fork and then scoop everything into a gallon size ziplock bag.   This is my little trick to keep my hands clean while having full control over kneading the dough.  Additionally, I don’t mind the kids helping me to make the dough, nor do I have to worry about the cleanliness of their hands when they’re kneading the dough on the outside of the bag.  #momwin #bakerwin

Knead the dough for about 5 minutes and then flatten into a disc.

Firm up the edges, for a perfectly round disc-should you prefer.  And then refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

I doubled the recipe and made two pie crusts, hence why I had extra flour & butter when I began to mix with my pastry mixer.

After 2 hours, remove the dough from plastic and place it on a floured surface, flour the top of the disc, and begin to roll out with your rolling pin.

If you’re fancy enough, roll the flattened dough up around your rolling pin and then unroll it on to your pie plate.  (I did not do that with this one, but did it with my top crust).

Crimp around the edges of the pie crust using about a finger spacing in between.

Line the unbaked pie shell with aluminum foil and then fill with dry uncooked beans.  This will help your pie shell not to fill with air bubbles while it bakes.

Bake on 350 degrees for 15 minutes.

Remove from the oven and your ready to go.  See?  Now that wasn’t so bad after all.

Will you try this recipe?  Maybe even get it under your belt before the holidays?  I want to hear from you.  Drop me a comment below or email me at: thingsshemakes@gmail.com

 

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